Surprisingly the World does not revolve around Nestle


Nestlé-Free Zone

The Nestle Boycott - (click on this link to see more important information)

You may or may not be aware that for over 30 years there has been a boycott by leading children’s organisations to boycott the list of foods and products that are associated with Nestle.

Why?

Well because they are one of the ‘most’ unethical food producers on the planet. Their aggressive promotion of baby milk and use of ‘uniformed sales people’ (as nurses) has been in question for many years and for very good reason.

The milk is offered ‘free’ as samples to mothers who are struggling  - long enough for their own breast milk to dry up and therefore is no longer available – then, the supply of milk is no longer free, but charged for.

In under-developed countries this can mean formula milk costing up to a quarter of the family income.

Another issue in countries such as this is the inedequate or poor water supplies, causing serious illness then death in babies using formula milk.

n May 2011, the debate over Nestlé’s unethical marketing of infant formula was relaunched in the Asia-Pacific region. 19 leading Laos-based international NGOs, including Save the ChildrenOxfamCARE InternationalPlan International and World Vision have launched a boycott of Nestlé and written an open letter to the company. Among other unethical practices, the NGOs criticized the lack of labelling in Laos and the provision of incentives to doctors and nurses to promote the use of infant formula.

The NCT (National Childbirth Trust) – the UK’s largest parenting charity heavily support the Nestle Boycott and have a dedicated web page giving information on all of the latest news.

There are many products on the Nestle Boycott List and you can find it here or as a drop down on the link at the top of the page.

If you have a ‘smartphone’ you can use this ‘smart’ link to make checking the list a whole lot easier when out shopping. Instead of showing the whole list, you can select catagories, like cereals or pet food. There are so many items on the Nestle list as they own a lot of companies and have many partners.

It was International Nestlé-Free Week from 31 October to 6 November 2011 - click here. I’m not sure it was publicised well enough – but I think as parents, if you want to support this boycott, then every week is Boycott Nestle Week!

If you already boycott Nestlé then use the resources on this page to spread the word.

If you want to know more information as to why there is a boycott and how you can get involved, read on.

http://www.babymilkaction.org/flash/ngg_widget/ngg_widget.swf

I shall quote the Baby Milk Action home page when I say:

“Nestlé is the target of a boycott because it contributes to the unnecessary death and suffering of infants around the world by aggressively marketing baby foods in breach of international marketing standards. Even Nestlé’s Public Affairs Manager acknowledges the boycott has widespread support.

According to the World Health Organisation, 1.5 million infants die around the world every year because they are not breastfed. The World Health Assembly has adopted marketing requirements for baby foods to protect breastfeeding and to ensure breastmilk substitutes are used safely if necessary.

Nestlé is singled out for boycott action as monitoring shows it to be responsible for more violations of the requirements than any other company. The boycott helps to stop some of the specific cases of malpractice we expose and has forced some changes in policy. But Nestlé continues systematic violations in those countries which have not yet brought in independently monitored and enforced legislation implementing the marketing requirements, which is another part of our strategy for protecting infant health and mothers’ rights”

If you doubt that Nestlé is doing anything wrong, see the monitoring evidence in our codewatch section.

Or see the investigations conducted by the Guardian (right) andUNICEF Philippines.

We have responded to some of the misinformation given out by Nestlé Public Relations Machine in a report submitted to the United Nations in June 2009 - click here.

Also see the Your Questions Answered section

  

Nestlé-Free Zone

Register your support for the boycott  - click on the above picture to see more details

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About HonieMummy (HonieBuk)

Mum of two girls (14 & 7 and step-Mum to one boy (13). All of whom are bright, fun-loving, creative and musical and make me proud and despite his disability (CP) my step-son and family face challenges with a smile and the will to succeed. Love to travel (mainly US/Canada/Scotland), passionate about photography, music is a must, always in HoniesKitchen, networking and of course my amazing family! I like to Blog infrequently whenever it takes my fancy and I don't mind sharing my ups and downs, advice and querky ideas with you all. I will mostly post recipes and photos of food, family and travel. I love to review products that my family and me would use - I kinda consider it my 'duty' to let you all know if something is as good as it says on the tin and a 'must buy' product, that all families should know about. Find these in HonieLikes. If you like what you see, please tell me - I work hard at these things :o)
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2 Responses to Surprisingly the World does not revolve around Nestle

  1. actuallymummy says:

    Gosh I had no idea! *goes off to check the cupboards* Thank you

    • It’s shocking really – but it’s why you’ll usually find Nestle products on offer in supermarkets.
      Obvious things are Nescafe, Nesquick as well Smarties, Milky Bar, Quality Street and all of the Rowntrees childrens sweets.

      I do wonder when the pressure will be put on supermarkets in a ‘name and shame’ way, much like it was with the cosmetics industry for using animal products/testing in the leading stores. I remember Boots, Avon, M&S being under fire for this and now all of their own brands are cruelty free (amongst other leading stores)! Unfortunately, the ‘huge’ cosmetic suppliers still do it!

      It’s down to consumer knowledge and ethics really – I know the products might be cheaper, but it is then hypocrytical to save money and contribute to children’s charities that support 3rd World Countries!!!

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